Number 19

I am number 19.  It has been a long wait from 02/15 to get to Number 19.  While I wait clients are not being services, jobs are not being created and the government has slowed it down.

The 16th of the month is the next time I can check.  I am afraid to get my hopes up, but it did drop 8 numbers.  If it does that again, I will be number 11.  Other times it only moved 3 or none.  It used to move about 20 a time.  I was excited and prepared to start interviewing and looking at electronic billing systems.

Now I am waiting until the number is under 10 to start on the electronic billing.  I will start collecting resumes in September to prepare for a quick move down the line.  I will start marketing for clients when I am under 5.  It is hard to plan a business when you don’t know when to start it.

Number 27

I am number 27 on the list for Mental Health Skill Building. I applied for it in Feburary 2015.  Yes that is right almost a year and a half ago. What is mental health skill building?  It is an in home service for the chronic mental health patients that have been hospitalization. We help them go to their medical appointments, their medications, socialization, and other needed services for 10 hours a week.  There professionals have a bachelors or better.  They are paid well.  They keep people out of the hospital.

These agencies like mine can hire about 10 people.  Right now an agency is number 285 on the list. That is 2,850 jobs waiting for almost 10,000 clients. We have shootings of and by mentally ill people.  The hospitals are full and can’t keep them.

I called to find out why.  They have two people for the whole state of Virginia to process the paperwork.  Virginia has 8.401 million people. If 10 % are mentally ill, that is 840,000 people.  These workers have to verify information, do office inspections, background checks and see if forms and procedures match current laws.  2 people.

If they move 3 steps a time, it will take an additional 9 months for my application to start the process.  That will be next year. How long can our mentally ill people wait?  How many jobs go unfilled?

I have contacted the papers, and wrote a Senator.  I am pushing on.  Next I go to television. I want to serve the disadvantaged, employ people.  Do my civic duty.

Number 27 is not so great after all.

 

 

Virginian pilot article

I probably should not watch the news.  I get too upset over injustice.  A prisoner in our jail who was mentally ill died.  He was in jail for shoplifting candy.  Most times he would spend a few days in and be out.  He was detained for months on a mental health order.  No bed was available.  He did not get proper treatment.  He was malnourished and suicidal.  He died.  The news papers and TV are all over it.  But there are no beds it isn’t our fault.  Why was he in jail so long for a shoplifting offense.  He wasn’t even convicted.  Jail guards are not prepared to deal with chronic mental illness.  He was in solitary, which deteriorated his condition.  His family tried to get him out.  Many visits were denied due to his behaviors. If there was no bed, he should have been sent home with a mental health skill building agency to work with him.  Oh wait, there aren’t enough of those.  Why is that?  I applied in 02/15 to be a mental health skill builder provider.  I was number 178 on the list.  Now in May I am number 38 on the list.  They have two workers in Richmond processing all the applications for developmental group homes, outpatient, MHSB, TDT, IHH, IOP, substance abuse, and transitional living.  The whole state of Virginia has two workers to process at the present time 258 applications.  This isn’t the department that audits and monitors.  I bet the fraud unit to recoup medicaid money has more than two workers.

The young man needed help.  His family wanted to help him.  We let him down by trying to save money.

Do the math.  Each agency would probably hire about 10 workers at over minimum wage.   258 x 10=2,580 jobs in our state.  New graduates just out of school in all parts of the state. One of those workers could have helped him, but the paperwork has bogged down their agency.

We should be ashamed.  Call your state delegate and senator.  The next person might be someone you love.

Patty Duke

I was saddened by the death of Patty Duke.  She was a champion for the rights of the mentally ill.  She bravely disclosed her diagnosis in a time when people didn’t do so.  She spoke out for others.  She was a celebrity that used her fame for good.  I will always remember her performance of Annie Sullivan in Helen Keller.  She was courageous.  She even wrote about her experience in her autobiography Call Me Anna.   Others have made public their illnesses after her brave disclosure.  Now it has less stigma and shame. Her son Sean Austin encourages people to send money to mental health or to her foundation.

www.pattyduke.net/links.html

The Patty Duke Mental health project.

My prayers and condolences to her family and friends.  Let her legacy live on.

 

 

First page of my novel

I finally have started my novel on my career as a therapist.  I will post exercpts from time to time and hope you will critique it.  I will try to be as honest as possible without giving away any client privledged information.  I also will shed light on various diagnosis, failed treatments, modalities.  I hope to have me grow as a person and learn as I write.  Many people go into this field wanting to save the world.  They have no clue.  The textbooks do not tell you about assessments in the hood, walking the park to engage the homeless, going into homes to look after children,  watching people detox,  doing therapy in a soup kitchen and jail.  It is a journey for me and for my clients. I also apologize to my first clients that I learned with and hope they got better anyway.

And don’t get me started on insurance billing.  They don’t touch that.

A to Z coping strategy

Diane Webb fellow blogger suggests using each letter of the alphabet to list something you are grateful for right now.  My list.

A- applesauce

B- Bella and Be Be my dogs and Beverly my daughter

C- church

D- David my Dad and David my husband ( 2 people)

E- electricity

F- French fried

G-gladiolas

H- the Hauers my new family

I- ice cream (duh)

J- jelly

K- klutzs

L- Lauren

M- music

N- noise (it means I can hear)

O- oolong tea

P- pizza

Q- questions

R- rest

S- salvation

T- teachers

U- universal love

V-Virginia my state

W- words

X- extraordinary life

Y- yarn to knit

Z- zest for living

You try it.

 

I am speechless. The article below made me wonder of the sanity of some of the “normal” people

Let People Just Out of Psychiatric Hospitals Have Their Guns Says NRA

Chicago

This summer’s bloodshed from people with mental illness attacking churches, military installations, movie theaters and this week a Manhattan federal building has not stopped the NRA’s guns-for-everyone-and-anyone agenda. The NRA-backed Mental Health and Safe Communities Act would restore the “gun rights” of someone who has been hospitalized for mental illness automatically–as soon as he is discharged. Why shouldn’t someone on heavy medication considered a threat to himself and others two days ago get his lethal weapons back the minute he leaves the hospital? Currently, someone who’s been involuntarily committed to a psychiatric hospital must petition for the restoration of his “gun rights” or wait for a court or administrative body to restore them.

The NRA-backed legislation is reminiscent of H.R. 2640–The National Instant Criminal Background Check System Improvement Amendments Act which the NRA supported after the Virginia Tech massacre. Seung-Hui Cho, the Virginia Tech killer, was found “mentally ill and in need of hospitalization” by the New River Valley Community Services Board but bought legal guns and ammunition anyway.
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Like the Mental Health and Safe Communities Act, HR 2640 sounded like it would make communities safer. But on its website the NRA wrote the bill was actually “better for gun owners than current law,” because “certain types of mental health orders will no longer prohibit a person from possessing or receiving a firearm,” like adjudications that have expired or been removed and “commitments from which a person has been completely released with no further supervision required.” Also excluded, said the NRA, “are federal decisions about a person’s mental health that consist only of a medical diagnosis, without a specific finding that the person is dangerous or mentally incompetent.”

Why does the NRA promote “gun rights” for people with mental illness? For the same reason it promotes “gun rights” for convicted felons, suspected domestic abusers and people under orders of protection. The NRA does not believe in “gratuitously tak[ing] away the rights of people because when you begin taking away the rights of people that you don’t like, that’s the slippery slope,” said NRA lobbyist Marion P. Hammer. “Don’t like?”

That is why after the murder of nine Charleston church worshippers by a suspect with white supremacy attitudes and clear mental problems, the NRA website ignored the massacre in favor of telling its followers—the “largest gun grab in American history” was underway.  “The Obama social security system plans to deny 4.2 million people the Right to Keep and Bear Arms,” screamed the NRA referring to a possible White House move to deny guns to Social Security beneficiaries ruled incompetent to manage their own pension or disability payments. Why should people who cannot manage their own affairs and likely have dementia be denied guns? Persecution!

This summer was rife with bloodshed from mentally ill people who should have never been able to buys guns–but shootings at Aurora, Tucson, the Navy Yard, Santa Barbara, Fort Hood and Northern Illinois University also underscore the dangers. Is the NRA serious about this legal prorvision?

Do you work for or patronize any of these top companies? Tell them to get off the sidelines and take a stand for gun safety with these pe-written tweets and posts.

National Gun Victims Action Council (NGVAC) is a non-profit network of 14 million gun victims, survivors, the faith community and ordinary people leveraging their buying power to change America’s gun laws. NGVAC initiated the successful action that caused Starbucks to change its gun policy. NGVAC pursues novel legal strategies to reduce gun violence and encourages corporate involvement. NGVAC can be found at www.gunvictimsaction.org.

 

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